Human Things and Divine Things

Second Sunday of Lent

If you’re reading this blog in preparation to preach this Sunday, then maybe you’re asking the same question I found myself asking this week: How many more of these sermons will we write? There was the Orlando sermon. And the Las Vegas sermon. The Charleston sermon and the Texas sermon. The Newtown sermon. And if you’ve been at this preaching thing long enough, there were the Virginia Tech and Columbine sermons too. And here we are again, in a sickeningly familiar cycle, wondering what to say this time in the Parkland, Florida sermon. Read more

Time and Mortality

Second Sunday of Advent
Isaiah 40.1-11
As I sat down to read through the scriptures for this second Sunday of Advent, I noticed something in the text from Isaiah that I most assuredly missed every other time I had ever read this passage. For right after those tender words of comfort that Handel chose for his Messiah—and those stirring words about mountains and valleys that Martin had in his dream—are these words that startled me this week:

All people are grass, their constancy is like the flower of the field. The grass withers, the flower fades, when the breath of the LORD blows upon it; surely the people are grass. The grass withers, the flower fades; but the word of our God will stand forever (Isaiah 40.6b-8, NRSV)

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Holy God

13th Sunday after Pentecost
Exodus 3:1-15

How do your prayers usually begin? Chances are there is a phrase, a title, an address that is more natural to you than all the others. I begin with “Loving God” about nine out of ten times—which undoubtedly says as much about my needs as it does about God’s character. All the other adjectives are left fighting for space in my remaining prayers: gracious, merciful, living, everlasting, and perhaps least of all, holy. These days, holy is a word reserved for the covers of Bibles, or to pair with the occasional expletive; holy is a word with far less popular appeal than love. And yet, holy is a word with deep roots in our faith—used consistently across the church’s history and throughout Scripture. So why has it all but dropped it from my/our language for God? Read more